Nutrition

Health Benefits of Bone Broth

By PSSM Staff

 

With the temperature dropping and winter coming keeping healthy is important to help stave of colds and other illnesses we are prone to in the winter months. Bone broths are rich in protein and a great source of minerals that support the immune system and contain healing compounds such as collagen, glutamine, glycine an proline. Bone broth also contains minerals in forms that your body can easily absorb such as calcium, magnesium, phosphorus, silicon, Sulphur and others.  Some of the benefits from consuming bone broth include joint protection, gut health, healthy skin, immune system function and detoxification properties which can give you that boost you need in the cold winter months where people are more prone to getting sick.

 

How to Make:

  1. Place bones into a large stock pot and cover with water. ( be sure to purchase animal products that are pasture-fed and free of antibiotics and hormones to unlock all the bone broth benefits)
  2. Add two tablespoons of apple cider vinegar to water prior to cooking. This helps to pull out important nutrients from the bones.
  3. Fill stock pot with filtered water. Leave plenty of room for water to boil.
  4. Heat slowly. Bring to a boil and then reduce heat to simmer for at least six hours. Remove scum as it arises.
  5. Cook slow and at low heat. Chicken bones can cook for 24 hours. Beef bones can cook for 48 hours. A low and slow cook time is necessary in order to fully extract the nutrients in and around the bone.
  6. You can also add in vegetables, such as onions, garlic, carrots and celery, for added nutrient value.

 

Tip:

Roasting the bones to brown and caramelize them will create better flavor.

 

Turkey Trot Tips

By PSSM Staff

If you’re planning on running a turkey trot later on this month first of all let me just say GOOD FOR YOU and CONGRATULATIONS ON EMBARKING ON SOMETHING MANY PEOPLE DON’T TRY. Whether you’re a seasoned vet runner or this is your inaugural trot there’s valuable tips for both camps to remember and lend an ear to. Here’s some suggestions to get you ready for race day!

  • Dress for the weather but don’t overdo it. Depending on where you live in the country the weather can either be super cold, warm and toasty or somewhere in between. Remember that your body temperature will rise once you get going so you don’t want to layer like crazy and risk overheating. Check your local forecast and use your best judgement when it comes to race day gear.
  • This may not be the day to wear the new running shoes you just bought. You’ll want to wear a pair that are reasonably broken for your feet but no so worn that you have inadequate support.
  • Take breaks when you need to and watch your pace. This isn’t a race for all the marbles. Yes, it’s good to push yourself but don’t overdo it. Most turkey trots are community events and people, whether they are running or walking, like to do the race with their families and some even bring their dogs. So if you have to slow down off of your pace to a jog or even walk every now and again. It’s okay. Just enjoy yourself, talk to the other racers, get to know your community and the people out there with you. You may make some new friends!
  • HAVE A GOOD TIME!!! No explanation needed. Make some great memories out there and enjoy yourselves!

Spilling the Fall Tea

By PSSM Staff

Now that the colder weather is upon us many will be indulging in their favorite hot beverages. Many people are tea drinkers and with good reason. It’s one of the healthiest drink options out there and one of the few that is just as enjoyable cold as it is hot so you can enjoy it’s health benefits year around if you so desire. Here’s a breakdown of some common types of tea and some of the health benefits you can get from consuming them regularly:

  1. Green Tea: The catechins in green tea are an excellent source of antioxidants. Green tea also contains a compound that helps to reduce risk of cardiovascular disease.
  2. Chamomile Tea: Commonly used the world over as a sleep aid chamomile tea is also a source of antioxidants that help reduce the effects of diabetes such as vision loss, nerve damage and renal damage.
  3. Oolong Tea: In addition to being delicious Oolong tea is also good for your teeth as its antioxidants prevent tooth decay. It’s also a good source of niacin which helps to detoxify the body as well.
  4. Echinacea: That’s right, the same Echinacea that they put in some of the cough drops you see in the drug store. Echinacea tea will help with your immunity fighting off that common cold and respiratory infections.

Lemon Ginger: This type of tea has a powerful combo of compounds that effectively fight bacterial infections; including salmonella.

Fall Stew

By PSSM Staff

Now that it’s cold outside now you may have already dusted of that good ol’ crock pot. Whipping up crock pot recipes is an easy way to make a filling and warming meal for you and your family. Stews tend to be very popular this time of year and with the plethora of meats and vegetables you can throw in there’s an amazing opportunity to cook up some tasty healthy options for the family. Here’s some different stew ingredient options and the health benefits they offer. Mix it up and try some combinations you haven’t done before! You just might surprise yourself and come up with a new family favorite!

Grass-Fed Beef: Protein, Iron, Vitamin B12, Niacin, Selenium, Vitamin B6, Zinc

Chicken: Protein, Selenium, Vitamin B6, Vitamin B3

Turkey: Protein, Iron, Zinc, Potassium, Phosphorus, Vitamin B6, Niacin

Carrots: beta-carotene, fiber, good antioxidant source, Vitamin A, Vitamin C, Vitamin K

Onions:Vitamin C, phytochemicals that boost immunity, Chromium, reduces inflammation

Celery:Vitamin K, Vitamin C, Potassium, Folate, Vitamin B6, antioxidant source

Parsnips: Potassium, manganese, magnesium, phosphorus, zinc, iron, Vitamin K, Vitamin B,       Vitamin C, Vitamin E, fiber,

Kale: fiber, aids digestion and elimination, folate, magnesium, numerous vitamins

Spinach: niacin, zinc, protein, fiber, vitamin A, vitamin C, vitamin E, vitamin K, thiamin, folate,  calcium, iron

Tomato: vitamin C, biotin, vitamin K, copper, potassium, manganese, Vitamin A, Vitamin E, folate, vitamin B6

Quinoa:protein, fiber, iron, lysine, magnesium, riboflavin, manganese

Halloween Fright Night

By PSSM Staff

Tempted to bust into your kiddos trick or treat candy??? Well, GET READY FOR A FRIGHT!! Those tiny treats may be smaller in size but they still pack a hefty punch. Here’s the 411 on the most popular Halloween candies, in their Halloween sizes, and the workout price tags they carry.

Reeses Peanut Butter Cups

Guess what? 5 MINI cups are going to cost you about 220 calories. If you want to burn that off get ready to jog for 17 minutes, swim for 15, bike for 40 or lift weights for 30.

Kit Kat

210 calories. That’s the price tag on two fun-sized kit kats. You can stay on the treadmill for 16 minutes or bike for about 30 to get that caloric allowance back.

Butterfinger

Two fun-sized butterfingers with cost you around 170 calories. So, get ready to jog or swim for about 15 minutes, lift weights for 20 or bike for 30.

Hershey Kisses

These sweet little treats are tiny so they are easy to lose track of in terms of how many you’ve eaten. Once you’ve hit 10 though you are 200 calories and 12 grams of fat in the hole. You’ll need to do about the same amount of work as the Butterfinger burn off.

Peanut M&M’s

A fun sized pack is about 90 calories. This will require you to run, lift weights, or swim for about 10 minutes or bike for 15.

Pass (on) the Pumpkin Latte

By PSSM Staff

It’s fall now and everybody is on pumpkin overload. It truly is a great time of year. The trees look beautiful the weather is gorgeous and folks are decorating their homes in a festive way which means, you guessed it, pumpkins everywhere! No doubt your favorite coffee stop has re-stocked their pumpkin spice flavored options, but what is the nutritional price tag on that cup of heaven you just have to have? Well, lets talk about it.

Lets talk about the sugar first. After all, this IS a sweet treat we are discussing. A standard pumpkin spice latte is going to yield about 50 grams of sugar. That’s comes out to 12 teaspoons. When you make coffee at home do you put 12 teaspoons of sugar in your mug? I hope not. If you were planning on adding your favorite scone or scrumptious little treat to your morning order you can go ahead and add to that sugar total. Over consumption of refined white sugar will trigger body to store the excess sugar as fat as well as increase your risk of insulin resistance and diabetes.

Here’s another bombshell for you. Given the caloric content of the typical pumpkin spice latte, even if you only limit yourself to one a day, you can say goodbye to about 20% of your daily caloric intake. Meaning, you’ve just drank 20% of your nutrition for the day without any actual nourishment being provided to your body.

Eat Your Breakfast

By PSSM Staff

 

Now that the weather has broken, and our chilly rain days seem to be a thing of the past, it is getting hotter earlier in the mornings. Many people site skipping breakfast in the summer months stating that it is too hot for them to eat so early in the mornings. The heightened temperatures make them uncomfortable enough to skip this very important meal. However, this is a poor choice in terms of health and here’s why.

When you skip breakfast you sacrifice your body’s ability to undergo certain key functions to the best of its ability. First and foremost you are denying your brain nutrients which will sacrifice its peak function. Breakfast is the first opportunity we have to re-nourish ourselves after an 8-12 hour fast; depending on your dinner, bed, and rising time. When you break this fast, hence “breakfast,” you are giving your brain its first fuel for the day.

When you eat breakfast your body comes out of “famine mode.” This means that your body will be cued to stop holding onto your stored nutrients, which it automatically does once you have not eaten for at least 3-4 hours, because you are eating new ones. What this does is keep your metabolism working which will translate to an energy kick start to get your day started. Even though the best way to kick start metabolism is exercise, having a good breakfast will fuel your body with nutrients needed for energy for that morning workout!

If you’re a heavy breakfast eater in the fall/winter and you trail off in the summer because you can’t fathom eating a whole lot on those hot summer mornings try a lighter breakfast that still packs a nutritional punch. Below are a few examples. As always, be careful of food allergies and intolerances and talk to your primary care physician or nutritionist to make sure you’re making choices that are appropriate for you and your family.

  1. Banana split with yogurt (instead of ice cream) and fresh berries/jam(instead of chocolate/strawberry/butterscotch sauces)
  2. Yogurt parfait
  3. Breakfast fruit salad (if you’re on the go you can even do a fruit kabob)
  4. Smoothie (another on the go option. Pick your favorite fruit and greens and toss them in a blender with some ice!)
  5. Cold oatmeal made with your favorite fruits and yogurt. (You can let the mixture sit in the fridge overnight to soften the oats.)

Phytonutrients

By PSSM Staff

Ever wonder why we are told to eat 9 servings of fruits and vegetables in a day?

This is because they contain compounds known as phytonutrients. The purpose of phytonutrients is to help protect the plant and increase the lifespan of the plant. Certain phytonutrients help to protect the plant from insects, while other phytonutrients help protect the plant from UV rays.

The good news is that these phytonutrients are passed along to those who eat them as well. To humans, phytonutrients have antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and liver-health promoting activities.

While fruits and vegetables are concentrated sources of phytonutrients, there are other plant foods like whole grains, legumes/beans, nuts and seeds, and herbs and spices that also contain phytonutrients.

How can you decide if a fruit or vegetable may be rich in these nutrients? For one, you can check the internet of the usual plants that you consume throughout your day. The second option would be paying attention to the plant’s color. Due to the fact that many phytonutrients also serve as the pigment that gives foods their deep colors, you can identify many phytonutrient-rich foods by looking for colorful foods!

Listed are examples of colors to look out for while in the supermarket.

Pay attention to blue or purple plant foods like blueberries, blackberries and red cabbage (all of these are rich in flavonoids). Keep an eye out for yellow-orange foods like carrots, winter squash, papaya, and melon (rich in beta-carotene). Maybe buy some red or pink foods like tomatoes, guava, and watermelon (rich in lycopene). Don’t forget about green foods like kale, spinach, and collard greens (rich in chlorophyll).

Not all phytonutrients give color, so it’s important to keep in minds foods such as garlic, onions, and leeks- all high in phytonutrients!

Information retrieved from:http://whfoods.org/genpage.php?tname=dailytip&dbid=286